Pipe Dream, Moab, UT

Before I headed back to Boulder after a few days of riding, I got one last one in.  Pipe Dream is a challenging trail below the Moab Valley Rim. It’s fairly technical as there are alot of rocks to hop as well as tight turns. The signage speaks of a “no dab challenge” which seemed impossible to me.

hunker down!
hunker down!

Captain Ahab (Amasa Back), Moab, UT

Captain Ahab is a rip roaring technical ride in Amasa Back down to Cliffhanger and Kane Creek road. It’s full of rock gardens and offers huge views of Jackson Hole and Canyonlands.  As you descend you’ll end up riding along Kane Creek on a cliff edge around huge boulders.  The exposure isn’t too bad, although there’s a soft left turn that you really need to make.

looking down on Jackson Hole
looking down on Jackson Hole

looking down on Kane Creek
looking down on Kane Creek Road
Kane Creek
Kane Creek
"No matter what the cows say."
“No matter what the cows say.”

Monitor Merrimac, Moab, UT

Monitor Merrimac is a relatively unknown but fun and easy ride outside of Moab.  There is a long slab of bumpy slickrock that you can bomb down if you do the loop clockwise.  There are a few sand traps, but they are short and easily walkable.  This is a nice ride for beginners, or to cap a long day of riding elsewhere in Moab.

riding clockwise
riding counter-clockwise
near the summit
near the summit

Pothole Arch (Amasa Back), Moab, UT

Got out last week to my favorite place and rode Amasa Back up to Pothole Arch.  Most folks who ride Amasa don’t bother going up to the arch, but they should.  There is some really fun slickrock riding, ledges and cliff edge riding with incredible views of Jackson Hole.  And the view from the top to the east and the La Sals is spectacular.

view from above Pothole Arch
view from above Pothole Arch

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Santa Maria da Feira, Portugal

We left Guarda in the late morning heading due west.  As we drove, we came upon and drove through several huge sections of burnt forest.  This was a bad year for wildfires all over Spain and Portugal

By the late afternoon we were close to Porto.  But as we drove, Cris spotted another castle sign on the highway, and we took the exit to check it out.  

a daunting approacha daunting approach

We ended up at the Castle of Santa Maria da Feira.

Castelo de Santa Maria da Feira

As we approached, we could tell this was a really cool castle, as it stood tall above all of the surrounding property. We got there just before it closed for the day, and had the whole place to ourselves.

The castle was built in 868 near an old Roman settlement.  It was a key military base for Christians as they took the Iberian peninsula back from the Islamic Moors.  Construction took place over many hundred years and completed in the middle of the 15th century.  After the family that owned it died out in the early 1700s, it fell into disrepair.  The castle was restored in 1909 and opened to the public shortly thereafter.

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Andy’s Loop, Pet-e-Kes, Grand Junction, CO

As part of exploring the Lunch Loops in Grand Junction a few weeks ago, I did Andy’s Loop to Pet-e-Kes.  Both rides are through really interesting geological terrain with bright whites, greens, reds, and oranges in the soil.  

Andy’s Loop

Andy’s provides some fun cliff edge riding.  I rode it in reverse direction to get to Pet-e-Kes, but will ride it normal direction next time to get the descent into the canyon.

Andy's Loop down into canyon
Andy’s Loop down into canyon
like a moonscape
like a moonscape
looking down on Andy's
looking down on Andy’s

Pet-e-Kes

I had ridden up Pet-e-Kes the day prior as part of Gunny Loop and thought it would be a really fun ride down.  I was right.  You weave fast through a bunch of interesting terrain with a wide variety of soil colors.

cool terrain
cool terrain
cool terrain
cool terrain

Castle Bran, Romania

Happy Halloween!  

A few years ago my family took a river cruise between Budapest, Hungary and Bucharest, Romania, and after we disembarked in Bucharest, we took a guided tour of Transylvania. One of the places we visited was Castle Bran, where Vlad the Impaler stayed. 

Vlad ruled this part of the world during the 1400s, and was particularly nasty.  He tortured his victims, both enemies and countrymen. His methods included slowly boiling people in large pots and skewering others on large stakes in the courtyard for all to see. Since he would have them impaled through the skin on their back, they wouldn’t die fast. Instead, the victim suffered slowly over the course of a day or two. Quite the nice guy. Therefore, he became the inspiration for Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

Our two tour guides told us that Romanians are really conflicted about the whole Dracula thing. They like that it generates revenue from tourists, but dislike how it puts the country in a negative light.  

One of the first stops on our tour was Castle Bran, where Vlad stayed on occasion. Outside of Romania, the castle is known as “Dracula’s Castle.” It’s a stunning castle that stands tall in the Carpathian mountains.

Bran Castle
Bran Castle
heading up to the castle
heading up to the castle
the castle juts up
the castle juts up
view from top
view from top

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Guarda, Portugal

We headed out early from Salamanca due west.  Our goal was to be in Porto, Portugal by the end of the day.

As we passed easily from Spain into Portugal, we noticed how nice the highways were.  To be clear, Spain has great highways (better than most US interstates), but Portugal’s were even nicer.  Smooth pavement, clearly marked signage, low traffic. 

We quickly found out why they were so nice and there were so few cars.  Nearly every highway in Portugal is tolled!

There were a few stretches for ~50 miles or so that weren’t tolled.  But as you approached any major city the tollbooths came into view.  We must have spent at least $200 or more on tolls in Portugal.

As the morning wore on, we approached a city with a cool looking cathedral on a hill.  We decided to pull over and go check it out. 

Guarda, Portugal

Guarda is a small city of 42,000 in a hilly region near the border with Spain.  It was founded by King Sancho I in 1199.  The main attraction is the cathedral.

Catedral da Guarda (Sé da Guarda)

On this trip I used Google Maps heavily. I clicked on the cathedral and let Maps guide me, and it worked flawlessly. However, these old towns have tiny streets all throughout, many one-way and even across public squares. My rule was that if I saw other cars, I just kept going. Up and up we went, and soon we turned a corner, drove across the main square, and parked right in front of the church. Rock star parking! Thank god we had a small car.

that us, parked right in front
that us, parked right in front

The cathedral construction began in 1199, and completed around 1550, and is a mix of Gothic and Manueline architectural styles. We entered the church, and to our delight, found we could climb a cylindrical staircase up to the the roof! That’s our second directive – climb everything we can.

rooftop access!
rooftop access!
another church in the distance
another church in the distance

After taking several cool photos on the church rooftop, we stopped at a cafe on the square for a coffee. Then we were back in the car and off to Porto.

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The Ribbon, Grand Junction, CO

The Ribbon has it all. Long slickrock with great views, ledges and edges (don’t cliff out!), and a bonus cave at the end to walk through.

After living for two decades on the Colorado front range, I decided to not blow through Grand Junction for Fruita and Moab, and check out the Lunch Loops.  I gotta say, this area is now high up on my favorites list.  

I started with The Ribbon, and was a bit nervous because my friend Jon warned me about this trail.  It isn’t all that well marked, and takes some sharp turns to avoid 10-30 foot cliffs. Jon has a friend who cliffed out  and had to be air-lifted to St Mary’s in Grand Junction (she healed up nicely). 

So I took my time.  

But wow, it’s such a cool trail.  Shortly after leaving the top parking lot you pop out onto an enormous slab of slick rock.

a huge slab of rock to ride on
a huge slab of rock to ride on

You ride fast for a long time, but you must pay attention as the rock narrows to just a few feet wide.

narrow section (don't cliff out!)
narrow section (don’t cliff out!)

Then you drop down into a tight set of turns through a feature.  

a tough feature ahead
a tough feature ahead

After the feature you again get atop a long slab of slickrock and fly down it to a stream bed.

hike up out of stream bed
hike up out of stream bed

Near the end of the trail you pass the start of Andy’s Loop, and hike up out of the canyon.  But as you ascend, you’ll find a bonus – a cave on the left.  Stop to walk into and check it out.

bonus: a cave!
bonus: a cave!

I had parked up on the road, and so I headed back to my car, but if you started below, Andy’s is a great ride.

from road looking down on Andy's and The Ribbon
from road looking down on Andy’s and The Ribbon

 

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Salamanca, Spain

After stopping at Cáceres we headed onto and arrived late in the afternoon in Salamanca.  Salamanca is the capital of the Salamanca province, part of the Castile and León region, and dates back to Celtic times.

Thanks to Booking.com we found a nice hotel near another old Roman bridge, checked in, and headed into old town to the main square.

Puente Romano
Puente Romano
headed to main square
headed to main square

As we passed the cathedral, we decided to do a quick tour before it closed.

Catedral de Salamanca

Catedral de Salamanca

The cathedral was constructed between the 16th and 18th centuries and has a mix of late Gothic and Baroque styles.

Catedral de Salamanca

Catedral de Salamanca

Catedral de Salamanca

Catedral de Salamanca

After the tour, we again headed toward the Plaza Major.

Cris and Felix near Plaza Major
Cris and Felix near Plaza Major

We were all getting a little “hangry,” so we stopped at restaurant on the square and had a wonderful Spanish dinner.  One thing I had learned by this point in the trip is when we are getting hangry, don’t try to find the best restaurant on Yelp.  Just pick something close – it’s going to be excellent, and we won’t be chewing on one another!

After dinner, we then headed back to the hotel, and caught some nice photos of the sunset and Roman bridge at night.

Catedral de Salamanca
Catedral de Salamanca
Puente Romano at night
Puente Romano at night

The next day we would head due west into Portugal.

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